Items of interest

These items are not for sale at the moment .

This is an example of a Mark IX £MG gramophone from about 1932. These gramophones were the brainchild of Ellis Michael Ginn and the strong a selling point was that they were “Hand-Made” rather than mass produced. This meant that production was always a struggle for the company which split into two separate enterprises in 1930. EMG gramophones continued to be made, but Ginn started up a rival company making “Expert” hand- made gramophones and radios. The history of the competing enterprises is explained in detail in Francis James’s book “The EMG Story”.
After much experimentation with different materials, the hall-mark if the EMG machines was the choice of Papier Mache to construct the oversized horns. These horns, in combination with excellent sound-boxes give really excellent sound reproduction. the sound-box in this case is a modified “Meltrope” type of box.

Here is a real rarity, the French made "Gypsy" gramophone, almost certainly the smallest gramophone made in that country. It Read more
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Here is a really early gramophone from the very beginning of recorded sound, possibly the very first commercially available music Read more
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This is a very early "portable" gramophone from about 1912. Although Decca gramophones had the reputation of being the first Read more
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This is a nice example of one of the many tin-plate toy gramophones produced in Germany in the early 1920s. Read more
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This is a mystery gramophone made in the form of a "Cameraphone" and is rather like the more usual examples Read more
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Collectors will be familiar with early wind-up gramophones which play, in general, 78 rpm discs. Some will have found the Read more
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This is an interesting and particularly attractive portable gramophone known as the "Folding Apollo" from 1921, (Proudfoot's book, Collecting Phonographs Read more
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Many small gramophones are referred to as cameraphones as they look rather like the Box-Browie cameras in use at the Read more
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